PATIENT FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Find financial assistance programs to support your patients

The Rituxan Immunology Co-pay Card Program helps eligible commercially insured patients with their drug co-pays for Rituxan.

Eligible commercially insured patients can receive up to $15,000 in assistance per 12-month period. They pay $5 per drug co-pay until the $15,000 limit is reached. See Terms and Conditions for more information.

GATCF=Genentech® Access to Care Foundation.

To learn more about how Rituxan Immunology Access Solutions can help your commercially insured patients with GPA and MPA:

For a list of approved distributors, please click here.

  • By using the Rituxan Immunology Co-pay Card Program, the patient acknowledges and confirms that, at the time of usage, (s)he is currently eligible and meets the criteria set forth in the terms and conditions described.
  • This Co-pay Card is valid ONLY for patients with commercial (private or non-governmental) insurance who are taking the medication for a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indication. Patients using Medicare, Medicaid, or any other government-funded program to pay for their medications are not eligible. Patients who start utilizing their government coverage during their enrollment period will no longer be eligible for the program.
  • This Co-pay Card Program is not health insurance or a benefit plan. Distribution or use of the Co-pay Card does not obligate use or continuing use of any specific product or provider. Patient or guardian is responsible for reporting the receipt of all Co-pay Card Program benefits or reimbursement received to any insurer, health plan, or other third party who pays for or reimburses any part of the prescription filled using the Co-pay Card Program, as may be required.
  • The Co-pay Card is not valid for medications the patient receives for free or that are eligible to be reimbursed by private insurance plans or other healthcare or pharmaceutical assistance programs (such as Genentech® Access to Care Foundation (GATCF) or any other charitable organization) that reimburse the patient in part or for the entire cost of his/her Genentech medication. Patient, guardian, pharmacist, prescriber, and any other person using the Co-pay Card agree not to seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received by the recipient through the offer.
  • The Co-pay Card will be accepted by participating pharmacies, physician offices, or hospitals. To qualify for the benefits of this Co-pay Card Program, the patient may be required to pay out-of-pocket expenses for each treatment. Once enrolled, this Co-pay Card Program will not honor claims with date of service or medication dispensing that precede program enrollment by more than 120 days. This Co-pay Card is only available with a valid prescription and cannot be combined with any other rebate/coupon, free trial, or similar offer for the specified prescription. Use of this Co-pay Card must be consistent with all relevant health insurance requirements and payer agreements. Participating patients, pharmacies, physician offices, and hospitals are obligated to inform third-party payers about the use of the Co-pay Card as provided for under the applicable insurance or as otherwise required by contract or law. The Co-pay Card may not be sold, purchased, traded, or offered for sale, purchase, or trade. The Co-pay Card is limited to 1 per person during this offer period and is not transferable. This program expires within 12 months from enrollment. This program is not valid where prohibited by law. For Massachusetts residents, the Co-pay Card is not valid for any prescription drug that has an AB-rated generic equivalent as determined by the FDA. For Massachusetts residents, this program shall expire on or before July 1, 2019.
  • The patient or their guardian must be 18 years or older to receive Co-pay Card Program assistance. This Co-pay Card Program is (1) void if the card is reproduced; (2) void where prohibited by law; (3) only valid in the United States and Puerto Rico; and (4) only valid for Genentech products. Healthcare providers may not advertise or otherwise use the program as a means of promoting their services or Genentech’s products to patients. Genentech reserves the right to rescind, revoke, or amend the program without notice at any time.

INDICATION

  • Rituxan® (rituximab), in combination with glucocorticoids, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA) (Wegener's Granulomatosis) and Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA)
  • Limitations of Use: Rituxan is not recommended for use in patients with severe, active infections

BOXED WARNINGS and Additional Important Safety Information

BOXED WARNINGS

Infusion Reactions: Rituxan administration can result in serious, including fatal infusion reactions. Deaths within 24 hours of Rituxan infusion have occurred. Approximately 80% of fatal infusion reactions occurred in association with the first infusion. Monitor patients closely. Discontinue Rituxan infusion for severe reactions and provide medical treatment for Grade 3 or 4 infusion reactions.

Severe Mucocutaneous Reactions: Severe, including fatal, mucocutaneous reactions can occur in patients receiving Rituxan. Discontinue Rituxan in patients who experience a severe mucocutaneous reaction.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Reactivation: HBV reactivation can occur in patients treated with Rituxan, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death. Screen all patients for HBV infection before treatment initiation, and monitor patients during and after treatment with Rituxan. Discontinue Rituxan and concomitant medications in the event of HBV reactivation.

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), including fatal PML, can occur in patients receiving Rituxan. Discontinue Rituxan and consider discontinuation or reduction of any concomitant chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy in patients who develop PML.

Warnings and Precautions

Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS): Administer aggressive intravenous hydration and anti-hyperuricemic therapy in patients at high risk for TLS. Correct electrolyte abnormalities, monitor renal function and fluid balance, and administer supportive care, including dialysis as indicated.

Infections: Serious, including fatal, bacterial, fungal, and new or reactivated viral infections can occur during and following the completion of Rituxan-based therapy. Infections have been reported in some patients with prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia (defined as hypogammaglobulinemia >11 months after Rituxan exposure). Discontinue Rituxan for serious infections and institute appropriate anti-infective therapy.

Cardiovascular: Discontinue infusions for serious or life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Perform cardiac monitoring during and after all infusions of Rituxan for patients who develop clinically significant arrhythmias or who have a history of arrhythmia or angina.

Bowel Obstruction and Perforation: Abdominal pain, bowel obstruction and perforation, in some cases leading to death, can occur in patients receiving Rituxan in combination with chemotherapy. Evaluate if symptoms of obstruction such as abdominal pain or repeated vomiting occur.

Immunization: The safety of immunization with live viral vaccines following Rituxan therapy has not been studied, and vaccination with live vaccines is not recommended. For RA patients, physicians should follow current immunization guidelines and administer non-live vaccines at least 4 weeks prior to a course of Rituxan.

Laboratory Monitoring: Obtain complete blood counts (CBC) and platelet counts at 2- to 4-month intervals during Rituxan therapy. The duration of cytopenias caused by Rituxan can extend months beyond the treatment period.

Concomitant Use With Biologic Agents and DMARDs Other Than Methotrexate in RA, GPA, and MPA: Limited data are available on the safety of the use of biologic agents or DMARDs other than methotrexate in RA patients exhibiting peripheral B-cell depletion following treatment with Rituxan. Observe patients closely for signs of infection if biologic agents and/or DMARDs are used concomitantly. Use of concomitant immunosuppressants other than corticosteroids has not been studied in GPA or MPA patients exhibiting peripheral B-cell depletion following treatment with Rituxan.

Retreatment in Patients With Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (GPA) (Wegener’s Granulomatosis) and Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA): Limited data are available on the safety and efficacy of subsequent courses of Rituxan in patients with GPA and MPA. In the active-controlled, double-blind study, subsequent courses of Rituxan were allowed for patients experiencing a relapse of disease. The safety and efficacy of retreatment with Rituxan have not been established.

Adverse Reactions

Clinical Trials Experience in GPA and MPA

Adverse reactions reported in ≥15% of Rituxan-treated patients vs cyclophosphamide-treated patients were infections (62% vs 47%), nausea (18% vs 20%), diarrhea (17% vs 12%), headache (17% vs 19%), muscle spasms (17% vs 15%), anemia (16% vs 20%), and peripheral edema (16% vs 6%), respectively.

Infusion Reactions: In the active-controlled, double-blind study, 12% vs 11% (Rituxan-treated vs cyclophosphamide), of patients experienced at least one infusion-related reaction. Infusion-related reactions included cytokine release syndrome, flushing, throat irritation, and tremor. In the Rituxan group, the proportion of patients experiencing an infusion-related reaction was 12%, 5%, 4%, and 1% following the first, second, third, and fourth infusions, respectively. Patients were premedicated with antihistamine and acetaminophen before each Rituxan infusion and were on background oral corticosteroids, which may have mitigated or masked an infusion reaction; however, there is insufficient evidence to determine whether premedication diminishes the frequency or severity of infusion reactions.

Infections: In the active-controlled, double-blind study, 62% vs 47% (Rituxan-treated vs cyclophosphamide-treated, respectively) of patients experienced an infection by Month 6. The most common infections in the Rituxan group were upper respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and herpes zoster. The incidence of serious infections was 11% vs 10% (Rituxan-treated vs cyclophosphamide, respectively), with rates of approximately 25 and 28 per 100 patient-years, respectively. The most common serious infection was pneumonia.

Hypogammaglobulinemia: Hypogammaglobulinemia (IgA, IgG, or IgM below the lower limit of normal) has been observed in patients with GPA and MPA treated with Rituxan. At 6 months, in the Rituxan group, 27%, 58%, and 51% of patients with normal immunoglobulin levels at Baseline had low IgA, IgG, and IgM levels, respectively, compared to 25%, 50%, and 46% in cyclophosphamide group.

Immunogenicity
A total of 23/99 (23%) Rituxan-treated patients with GPA or MPA tested positive for HACA by 18 months. The clinical relevance of HACA formation in Rituxan-treated patients is unclear.

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555(888) 835-2555.

For additional Important Safety Information, please see the Rituxan full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNINGS.

Attention Healthcare Provider: Provide Medication Guide to patient prior to Rituxan infusion.

 
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